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26 March 2012

An ArtsyPhotoEdit

I was browsing through Twitter tonight when I saw the following tweet:




So I clicked on it!


I was immediately hooked. I have recently discovered the power of post-processing, especially when turning an underexposed, overexposed or blurry photo into something useable. This might have something to do with all my itouch photos..!  Whatever, I was tired of editing zoo pictures, so decided to give this girl's photo a go...


The original photo straight out of the camera:




Jennifer provided the photo to download and edit in both jpeg and DNG format. I used the DNG format, of course!

I also created two versions of this photo, a simple edit, and a SuperArtsyEdit, which is what I would do with the photo if it were mine to scrap! I'll start with the simple edit:


Simple Edit




simple_edit



To do this:
  1. Open the DNG file in Camera Raw
  2. Move the Exposure Slider a teeny bit to brighten the photo without blowing out the highlights
  3. Move the Fill Light slider to the right until the picture starts to get noisy.
  4. Open the photo and Sharpen/Defog (I use Scott Kelby's Sharpening Method mentioned in his Photoshop CS2 for Photographers Book)
  5. Duplicate the Background Layer (ctrl + J) and change the blend mode to SCREEN
  6. Create a Layer Mask on the Screen Layer, choose a large, soft paintbrush at a low opacity and color in the overexposed areas on the screen layer until the two layers blend together.
This is where i had some fun. I used:




  1. Drag WarmGlows onto the photo beneath the screen layer and change blending mode to 'OVERLAY' (In this photo, there is a WarmGlow lighting up her toes, the back of her highchair and shoulder, & in the bottom left corner.
  2. Drag a CoolGlow onto the photo beneath the screen layer, change blending mode to OVERLAY and layer beneath WarmGlow highlighting her toes.
  3. Drag HeartBokeh onto photo's TOP Layer. Change the brush color and Blending mode to 'SCREEN'. Place this Bokeh above her toes.
  4. Drag 2nd Bokeh Brush onto photo, recolor and change Blending Mode to 'Linear Dodge'. Place this Bokeh on window.
  5. Flatten and save.
Now, I like an artsy edit best, and if this were my photo, this is how I would edit it (and it is actually a quicker edit, though it looks more complicated!


Super Artsy Edit






Super_ArtsyEdit

To do this (these steps are the same as the simple edit above):
  1. Open the DNG file in Camera Raw
  2. Move the Exposure Slider a teeny bit to brighten the photo without blowing out the highlights
  3. Move the Fill Light slider to the right until the picture starts to get noisy.
  4. Open the photo and Sharpen/Defog (I use Scott Kelby's Sharpening Method mentioned in his Photoshop CS2 for Photographers Book)
  5. Duplicate the Background Layer (ctrl + J) and change the blend mode to SCREEN
  6. Create a Layer Mask on the Screen Layer, choose a large, soft paintbrush at a low opacity and color in the overexposed areas on the screen layer until the two layers blend together.
NOW it gets SuperArtsy! You will need ArtsyKardz SunFun 6x8  by Anna Aspnes (these are layered .psd files). 


  1. Open the AASPN_6x8ArtsyKardzSunFun_1.psd and drag your edited photo onto the layer above the Background layer.
  2. Change the Blending Mode of your Photo to 'Color Burn'
  3. Duplicate the Photo and change the Blending Mode to 'Screen'.
  4. Duplicate the Photo, move to the bottom of the heap, change the Blending Mode to 'Normal'
  5. Duplicate the Normal Mode Photo and Hide It (click on the eye).
  6. Create a Layer Mask on your Normal Photo layer and fill the whole thing in with Black before taking a soft brush with a low opacity and carefully coloring in the bottom of the photo, creating more opacity to the legs and highchair and losing the pattern from the BG paper.
  7. Show your hidden layer and change the Blending Mode to 'Screen'.
  8. Duplicate your Layer Mask (hold the alt key and drag the layer mask to the new layer). Color in any bits that need more opacity, making sure the photo doesn't get too dark.
  9. Create a Layer Mask on the Color Burn Photo Layer and use a soft brush with a low opacity to carefully erase some of the photo, letting the color and pattern of the background paper show through.
  10. Duplicate this layer mask on the last photo layer.
The photo is now ready to be used on a layout! You can print it out (it's a 6"x8" card) like normal, or use it on a digital layout.

Thanks Jennifer for giving me something to do tonight that was just fun!




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12 comments:

Jennifer said...

Wow, this is amazing!

Anonymous said...

Ooooooooooooooooooooh,
this is insane
this is incredible
LOVE LOVE LOVE
great job. FABULOUS!!

(HUGS) ViVre

*Paula* said...

Fabulous Amber!

Tracy Little said...

Amber that is awesome!

Anonymous said...

Amber this is awesome! Nancy

Aino said...

Well done Amber!! I would never have thought of using Anna's glow brushes like this!! Amazing!

Unknown said...

oh man that is really cool!

Chris Asbury said...

Amber, I love the super artsy edit. Amazing!

Tanja said...

Ich hätte niemals gedacht, dass man soviel aus dem Bild herausholen kann. Wow. Super gemacht!! (Beide Versionen, auch wenn die erste mich mehr verblüfft hat)

Deb Rymer said...

Fabulous tutorial, Amber!

Eszter(beszteri) said...

Fabulous and useful tutorial, Amber, thank u!

♥ Audrey ♥ said...

Thanks for the tip! I've got tons of photos like that!